News

  • Charities and Fundraising
  • Community
  • Griffin Campus
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Saturday November 16th 2019 will mark the Inaugural Dawg Dash 5K and 1-mile Fun Run/Walk.  

Open to everyone and all fitness levels are welcome.

Proceeds will benefit the Griffin-Spalding County Way and the University of Georgia Griffin Campus.

Medals awarded for 1st and 2nd Place Overall as well as 1st Place in each age category.

First 200 participants to pre-register will receive a T-shirt

Pre-Registration - $20.00 per run/walker (Open until November 13th)

Same-day registration - $25.00 per run/walker 

Register online: https://dawgdash2019.eventbrite.com

If you would like a paper registration form or would like to volunteer, please contact Beth Horne @ bhorne@uga.edu or call 770-228-7214

Download the 2019 Dawg Dash flyer here

  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Community
  • Entomology
  • Griffin Campus
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We are pleased to announce that Dr. G. David Buntin, a dedicated member of the UGA faculty, has been named Interim Assistant Provost and Campus Director at the UGA Griffin campus, effective Nov. 1. He succeeds Dr. Lew Hunnicutt, who has been named the president of Nash Community College in Rocky Mount, North Carolina.  Dr. Hunnicutt has made several contributions to the UGA Griffin campus, including increasing graduate enrollment, elevating private support, and strengthening partnerships with the local community. I hope that you will join us in thanking him for his leadership at UGA-Griffin and congratulating him on his new leadership role.  Dr. Buntin is a professor of entomology in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and his research and extension activities focus on integrated pest management. He has been an active member of several committees at both the college and university level, and we appreciate his willingness to lead UGA-Griffin during this transition period.

 

  • Center for Urban Agriculture
  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Griffin Campus
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University of Georgia Department of Entomology Professor Dan Suiter has been named the chair of the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture Faculty Advisory Committee.

Suiter’s appointment will enhance the programming aspect of the center, according to Laura Perry Johnson, associate dean for UGA Cooperative Extension in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES). Suiter will work closely with center Director Sheldon Hammond, who will continue to oversee the business and personnel administration functions of the center.

Based on the UGA Griffin campus, the Center for Urban Agriculture supports UGA Extension’s urban programs by providing county agent training programs, tools and resources; communicating the latest research-based urban agriculture advice through newsletters, articles, alerts, publications, videos and social media; organizing new initiatives; collaborating on interdisciplinary projects and research; advancing and updating current program training materials; and administering multiyear programs and projects.

“Our state continues to have population growth and most of that is in the nine largest counties in Georgia. Issues and problems associated with this urban growth come in many forms and cross many disciplines and departments,” Perry Johnson said. “Dan will work to build diverse teams around urban issues and coordinate programming efforts related to urban programs and projects.”

  • Center for Food Safety
  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Griffin Campus
  • Research
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Two University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences food scientists have been presented awards of excellence from the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP). Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat and Professor Francisco Diez were recognized at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24 in Louisville, Kentucky.

Beuchat received the Maurice Weber Laboratorian Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions in the laboratory. The award also honors his commitment to the development of innovative and practical analytical approaches in support of food safety.

He joined the Department of Food Science and Technology on the UGA Griffin campus in 1972 and has since published five books and 530 refereed scientific journal articles.

Beuchat is a world authority on the microbiology of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes; methods for detecting yeasts, molds and pathogenic bacteria in foods; metabolic injury of bacteria and fungi; relationships of water activity to microbial growth; antimicrobial compounds in foods; fermented foods; thermal resistance of mold ascospores; and food preservatives.

Most of Beuchat’s research at the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin focuses on how food safety issues relate to foods of plant origin.

  • Center for Food Safety
  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Griffin Campus
  • Research
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Consumers have long been warned against the hazards of eating raw cookie dough. As more cases of foodborne illness are linked to contaminated wheat flour, University of Georgia food safety experts are touting the risk in a louder, more forceful voice, while searching for ways to eliminate foodborne pathogens on wheat products.

In wheat-related cases, the common carriers of the pathogens are cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour. The most recent outbreak started in May and was linked to wheat flour contaminated with E. coli 026 bacteria. Three brands of contaminated all-purpose flour were found at grocery stores in eight states, to date. So far, 21 cases of E. coli 026 infections have been reported.

In 2005, 26 cases in the U.S. were linked to cake-batter ice cream and in 2008 a cluster of cases in New Zealand were connected to an uncooked baking mixture. In all of these cases, the pathogen was Salmonella. In 2009, an E. coli O157:H7 outbreak resulted from consumption of raw cookie dough.

“In the past, the reason we warned people not to eat cookie dough was not because of the flour, but because of the raw eggs,” said Francisco Diez, director of the UGA Center for Food Safety located on the university’s campus in Griffin, Georgia. “The two main pathogens linked to wheat products are Salmonella and E. coli.”

Diez says these cases could have been prevented if the flour had not been consumed raw.

  • Athens Campus
  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Griffin Campus
  • Tifton Campus
  • Young Scholars Program
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This year, 60 students from across the state and two from outside of Georgia joined the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Young Scholars research program and broke new ground in the agricultural sciences.

For more than two decades, the CAES Young Scholars Program has paired the college’s researchers with high school students to foster students’ love of science and introduce them to the breadth of study that forms the foundation of agriculture, Georgia’s largest industry.

During the Young Scholars Program, students are paid to work as research assistants in laboratories across the college to complete real research projects alongside faculty mentors.

  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Cooperative Extension
  • Griffin Campus
  • Horticulture
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Svoboda “Bodie” Vladimirova Pennisi, a full professor and UGA Cooperative Extension Specialist at the UGA Griffin campus, will work with the Small Business Development Center to implement online learning opportunities. Pennisi’s online business training module will be designed to help entrepreneurs and managers run a successful landscape management business by covering critical topics such as financials, marketing, cost estimating, employee retention and customer service, all catered to the landscape management field. In the future, the module will be used across UGA Extension and adopted for a new online class for undergraduate students. An experienced online educator, Pennisi will apply her horticulture and landscape expertise to help small businesses across Georgia.

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Ms. Kathy Rhodes, Mentor Program Coordinator for the Spalding County Collaborative, spoke on Tuesday, April 16, 2019, to students and guests of Dr. Watts Warren’s SOCI 3820S Communities and Crime class on mentoring opportunities in the Griffin-Spalding area.  A service-learning course designed in concert with the UGA Archway Partnership, Dr. Watts Warren’s students examine micro-level processes in local communities that can be generated to combat crime and delinquency.   Students spend a portion of their time in class examining theoretical positions and time outside of the classroom engaging in the community.  Mentoring programs, such as the one described by Ms. Rhodes, have been shown to not only result in a greater likelihood of children remaining engaged in school and with less delinquency but to also facilitate “collective efficacy” - a critical theoretical position of the course.

 

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  • Community
  • Franklin College of Arts and Sciences
  • Griffin Campus
  • Microbiology
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Students of Dr. Margie Paz, senior lecturer in the Department of Microbiology of the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, recently fulfilled a service-learning activity related to their Introduction to Microbiology Laboratory (MIBO 3510L) class.  They talked with students that attend Griffin High School about different fields of study in microbiology, as well as career paths, and college life on the UGA Griffin Campus.  It was an educational experience that aimed to provide UGA-Griffin students with an opportunity to gain enhanced learning, a broader appreciation of microbiology, and a sense of civic responsibility.

  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Food Science and Technology
  • Griffin Campus
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In December of 1976, Sue Ellen McCullough took a job at the University of Georgia Griffin campus — then known as the Georgia Experiment Station — on the advice of a neighbor. On March 29 she retired from UGA-Griffin, taking with her a trove of memories and experiences.

“Dr. Wayne Bough was a faculty member and he was also my neighbor,” said McCullough, a native of Griffin. “We talked about me coming to work for him and he told me to ask my husband if I could work with him for about four months.”

The “temp” job turned into a nearly 40-year career with UGA’s Department of Food Science and Technology.

McCullough had worked at the local hospital and for Southern Bell, but she had no idea what to expect working in a laboratory at UGA. Bough was working on a grant project funded by UGA Marine Extension and the Georgia Sea Grant program, so McCullough’s first experiences were a little fishy.

“I was working with shrimp shells,” she remembers. “I had to dry them up in the shop in a big huge oven. When the men who worked in the shop saw me coming, they weren’t happy, because it did not smell good at all.”

When Bough left Griffin to accept a position with UGA Marine Extension in Brunswick, Georgia, McCullough went to work with UGA food scientist Kell Heaton. For the next six years, she helped him on various projects like canning peaches and peppers and working with other commodities, like pecans.