A University of Georgia degree is closer than you think.

University of Georgia Griffin was originally established as Georgia Experiment Station in 1888 and has played an integral role in the development of modern agriculture. While the campus is mostly known for its groundbreaking advancements in agricultural and environmental sciences, UGA-Griffin began offering degree completion programs in 2005. Students at UGA-Griffin enjoy low student-to-faculty ratios, and many students are able to take advantage of on-campus work and directed research opportunities so that they can gain real-world work experience while earning their University of Georgia degree.

UGA-Griffin is also host to the Office of Continuing Education which provides innovative lifelong learning opportunities through its programs. Additionally, Continuing Ed offers youth and community outreach programs, as well as conference space for other meetings and special events.

Contact us for more information about academic programs or for other general inquiries.

Spotlight on Campus News and Events

MS in FP Information Session

Academics
Campus Events
Deadlines
Tuesday, October 10, 2017

M.S. in Financial Planning Information Session

Tuesday, October 10th, 6.30pm-7-30pm.

Location: Student Learning Center Room 105, UGA Griffin Campus
 

You are invited to attend our information session on Tuesday, October 10, 6.30pm-7-30pm
Explore our Master of Science program in Financial Planning that is now offered at the UGA Griffin Campus in the South Metro Atlanta area.

 

• Small classroom sizes and flexible schedules
• Application deadline for Spring 2017: November 15, 2017
• GRE/GMAT waiver possibility for eligible applicants
• Upon completion, you will be prepared to sit for the Certified Financial Planner TM 
examination.

Registration Link 

African scientist working at UGA to improve food safety at home

Posted on
Monday, May 15, 2017

Daniel Mwalwayo has spent most of his professional career working to ensure a safe food supply in his home country of Malawi.

This spring, he’s spending three months focused on that goal while training at the University of Georgia through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Norman E. Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program. The program, which is administered at UGA by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Global Programs, promotes food security and economic growth by providing training and collaborative research opportunities to researchers and policymakers from developing or middle-income countries.

After nearly a decade working for the national food inspection program in Malawi, Mwalwayo wanted to study how to minimize aflatoxin in processed peanuts, a problem he sees firsthand at home. The Borlaug program matched him with Koushik Adhikari, a UGA food science professor who is an expert in sensory analysis and is working with Mwalwayo on how to survey consumers on peanut consumption and aflatoxin-related issues. Mwalwayo also spent time in the lab of Jia-Sheng Wang, the head of the Environmental Health Science Department at UGA, to learn more about aflatoxin testing techniques.

Deng awarded UGA Creative Research Medal for salmonella classification software

Posted on
Thursday, May 11, 2017

University of Georgia food microbiologist Xiangyu Deng’s work in the emerging field of bioinformatics led to his selection as a Creative Research Medal winner for 2017. 

The medal is one of the prestigious honors bestowed annually by the UGA Research Foundation. Awards are given to outstanding faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students in recognition of excellence in research, scholarly creativity and technology commercialization at UGA.

Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus, was recognized for creating a cloud-based software tool that quickly classifies strains of salmonella, one of the most prevalent foodborne pathogens in the United States and worldwide. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 million foodborne illnesses and 380 deaths in the U.S. each year can be linked to nontyphoidal salmonella.

The SeqSero system identifies serotypes, or distinct strains of salmonella, from infected humans, animals, foods and the environment using whole genome sequencing. This system allows for accurate, fast “fingerprinting” of any salmonella strain and replaces a complicated, time-consuming laboratory protocol. Analysis time using SeqSero takes just minutes — analysis using the old system took days — while adding no extra cost.

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