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Student Learning Center at UGA Griffin Students studying in front of the Naomi Chapman Woodruff Pavilion UGA Griffin used to be called Georgia Experiment Station, as represented by the sign that remains in front of the campus today Students studying in front of the Naomi Chapman Woodruff Pavilion Attendees arrive for an event at the Naomi Chapman Woodroof Pavillion at UGA Griffin Campus

A UGA degree is closer than you think.

University of Georgia Griffin was originally established as Georgia Experiment Station in 1888 and has played an integral role in the development of modern agriculture. While the campus is mostly known for its groundbreaking advancements in agricultural and environmental sciences, UGA Griffin began offering degree completion programs in 2005. Students at UGA Griffin enjoy low student-to-faculty ratios, and many students are able to take advantage of on-campus work and directed research opportunities so that they can gain real-world work experience while earning their University of Georgia degree.

For more information or for general inquiries, please fill out our contact form or call (770) 412-4400.

Important Dates

UGA-Griffin Campus Holiday Fundraiser

Until Friday, December 16, 2016

For a $25 donation you can choose one of the following:

Boston Butt or Half a Pork Loin

Your selection will be hot at the time of pick-up and ready-to-eat! Tickets are available for purchase until Friday, December 16 and may be purchased from Steve Sutton, Beth Horne, Ken Manley, or Be-Atrice Cunningham (see the directory for contact information).

Lunch will be available on December 20th from 11:30am until 1:00pm. $5 covers a BBQ sandwich, chips, and a drink. Stop by and grab a hot lunch!

Proceeds benefit the Griffin-Spalding County United Way.


Graduation and Brick Ceremonies

Thursday, December 15, 2016

​Fall 2016 Graduation Ceremony in Stuckey Audtorium

Brick Ceremony for graduates at the Naomi Chapman Woodroof Pavilion


Christmas Holidays

December 26 - 30, 2016

Campus closed


New Year's Day Holiday

Monday, January 2, 2017

Campus closed


New Student Orientation

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

​10am, Student Learning Center, Room 115


Spring Classes Begin

Thursday, January 5, 2017


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Holiday

Monday, January 16, 2017

Classes not in session
​Campus closed


Undergraduate Application Deadline for Summer Semester

Monday, May 1, 2017


Memorial Day Holiday

Monday, May 29, 2017

Campus closed


View more important dates


Academic Calendar 2015-2016
Academic Calendar 2016-2017


Weather Closing Procedures for UGA-Griffin

Spotlight on UGA-Griffin Campus Holiday Fundraiser

Cartoon pig wearing a Santa hat

For a $25 donation you can choose one of the following: Boston Butt or Half a Pork Loin

Your selection will be hot at the time of pick-up and ready-to-eat! Tickets are available for purchase until Friday, December 16 and may be purchased from Steve Sutton, Beth Horne, Ken Manley, or Be-Atrice Cunningham (see the directory for contact information).

Lunch will be available on December 20th from 11:30am until 1:00pm. $5 covers a BBQ sandwich, chips, and a drink. Stop by and grab a hot lunch!

Proceeds benefit the Griffin-Spalding County United Way.



Spotlight on Research: Researcher on hunt for grasses that can thrive in Georgia summers

by Sharon Dowdy
Posted Mon, October 31, 2016
The newest member of UGA's turfgrass team, David Jespersen researches varieties of turfgrass that are heat and drought tolerant. Photo by Sharon Dowdy.
The newest member of UGA’s turfgrass team, David Jespersen researches varieties of turfgrass that are heat and drought tolerant. Photo by Sharon Dowdy.

Like most college students, David Jespersen was unsure of what he wanted to study. At first, he was intrigued by psychology, but the required biology and science classes drew him to plant sciences. As a result, he’s now the newest member of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ turfgrass research team. “Something about the plant sciences grabbed my interest as being practical and underappreciated,” said Jespersen, who now conducts research on the UGA campus in Griffin.

Jespersen earned a doctorate in plant biology with an emphasis in turfgrass physiology from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

A native of New Jersey, Jespersen is adjusting to life in the South and the relentlessly intense heat of Georgia summers.

“Summers (in New Jersey) are kind of hot. It hits the 90s (degrees Fahrenheit) and there’s an occasional heat wave hitting 100 (F),” he said, just a few days after sharing his research results in humid, near-100-degree weather at the outdoor UGA Turfgrass Field Day, a research event held biennially in August.

He is also adjusting to working on a smaller extended university campus.

“Everyone on the Griffin campus is very friendly, but it’s not as lively as a large campus,” he said. “It’s definitely a lot easier not to get distracted and to focus on research.”

Ninety percent of Jespersen’s time will be spent conducting research, with 10 percent allotted for teaching.
At Rutgers, he enjoyed being a teaching assistant and head teaching assistant for general biology laboratory classes.
Jespersen was hired to fill the position of retired turfgrass physiologist Bob Carrow based in part on his research on the effects of heat stress on creeping bentgrass.

“(Creeping bentgrass) is one of the most widely grown grasses for golf courses, and it’s one of the preferred grasses because of its fine texture,” he said. “A huge majority of golf courses in the Northeast use it, and a decent amount of courses in Georgia have it because it has a higher quality that golf course superintendents are looking for. You just have to baby it a lot more, especially in the summer.”

While at Rutgers, Jespersen worked on a collaborative project with UGA CAES turfgrass breeders Paul Raymer and Brian Schwartz. Together they screened a collection of creeping bentgrass varieties for heat and drought resistance. Their research will aid in the development of new turfgrass varieties that can thrive better in
Georgia summers.

As the new UGA CAES turfgrass physiologist, Jespersen’s focus is on abiotic stresses.

“I’m looking at the effects of drought, heat, salinity and environmental stresses on turfgrasses to understand which turfgrasses are more tolerant. Then I’ll determine which underlying mechanisms are responsible for those traits,” he said.

Once Jespersen finds these resistant plants, he will share his findings with UGA turf breeders, like Raymer and Schwartz.

“These are experimental turfgrass varieties, so they may be aesthetically unappealing or lack other traits you want, but have some beneficial traits that can be combined with other grasses to create a superior grass,” he said.

Read the original article on Columns.



Spotlight on Extension: School gardens on the rise as teachers use them to teach STEM education

by Sharon Dowdy
Posted Tue, July, 19, 2016
UGA Extension community and school garden coordinator Becky Griffin speaks to a group of teachers at a school garden curriculum training at UGArden in Athens this summer. Image credit: Merritt Melancon.
UGA Extension community and school garden coordinator Becky Griffin speaks to a group of teachers at a school garden curriculum training at UGArden in Athens this summer. Image credit: Merritt Melancon.

Planting gardens at schools is not a new concept. The school garden movement first took off in 1917 when the U.S. School Garden Army was created with the motto, “A garden for every child, every child in a garden.” As of late, school gardens have experienced resurgence. A growing number of teachers are embracing school gardens to teach students much more than how to put a seed in the ground, care for it, watch it grow and enjoy the harvest provided by the plant.

Becky Griffin, community and school garden coordinator for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, says school gardens are gaining momentum for several reasons, including science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education requirements.

“Schools can get a feather in their cap for using their school garden to meet the STEM certification,” Griffin said. “Teachers use their gardens to teach history by growing beans that (Meriwether) Lewis and (William) Clark brought back from their expedition, and they plant colonial gardens filled with crops from the time of George Washington. They also use school gardens to teach math. You use lots of division and recording to plant a garden. Some teachers have the students grow their crops in geometric shapes.”

English teachers use school gardens by reading a book, then planting crops or flowers that were mentioned in the book, Griffin said.

School gardens are an excellent educational tool, but they are also hard work. In Coweta County, Georgia, Griffin was called in to consult on a potential school garden before the soil was tilled and the seeds were planted.

“First, the school administration needs to be on board, then the teachers, the parents and community leaders,” she said. “If the garden is being planned and planted by just one teacher, it’s going to fail. In the summer and during breaks from school, you need volunteers to help weed and water and care for the garden.”

To help Georgia teachers grow gardens and successfully use them as teaching tools, UGA Extension and the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture offer school garden teacher training. In the summer of 2015, 60 teachers from 24 Georgia counties were trained at workshops help in Athens, Atlanta and Griffin, Georgia. They learned about crops that are in season during the school year, how to test garden soil before planting and how to control pests using as little pesticide as possible.

For more information on this program, visit ugaurbanag.com/gardens/teacher-training.

Read the original article on the CAES website.