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Student Learning Center at UGA Griffin Students studying in front of the Naomi Chapman Woodruff Pavilion UGA Griffin used to be called Georgia Experiment Station, as represented by the sign that remains in front of the campus today Students studying in front of the Naomi Chapman Woodruff Pavilion Attendees arrive for an event at the Naomi Chapman Woodroof Pavillion at UGA Griffin Campus

A UGA degree is closer than you think.

University of Georgia Griffin was originally established as Georgia Experiment Station in 1888 and has played an integral role in the development of modern agriculture. While the campus is mostly known for its groundbreaking advancements in agricultural and environmental sciences, UGA Griffin began offering degree completion programs in 2005. Students at UGA Griffin enjoy low student-to-faculty ratios, and many students are able to take advantage of on-campus work and directed research opportunities so that they can gain real-world work experience while earning their University of Georgia degree.

​UGA-Griffin is preparing to welcome a new group of students to the Bulldog Nation! All new students are required to register for and attend New Student Orientation on August 5, 2016 at 8:30am in the Student Learning Center. If you are a new student and have not yet registered, click here to go to the registration page. Welcome to the University of Georgia, and GO DAWGS!

Important Dates

UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day

Thursday, August 4, 2016

The UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day will be on Thursday, August 4 and registration is open. For registration and program information, please visit www.GeorgiaTurf.com.


New Student Orientation

Friday, August 5, 2016

Check-in begins at 8:30am in the Student Learning Center. ​Registration and attendance is required for all new students. Register for New Student Orientation here.


Fall Classes Begin

Thursday, August 11, 2016


Labor Day Holiday

Monday, September 5, 2016

Classes not in session
​Campus closed


Fall Midterm

Tuesday, October 4, 2016


Withdrawal Deadline for Fall Classes

Tuesday, October 18, 2016


Fall Break

Friday, October 28, 2016

​Classes not in session


Undergraduate Application Deadline for Spring Semester

Tuesday, November 15, 2016


Thanksgiving Break

November 21 - 25, 2016

Classes not in session


Thanksgiving Holiday

November 24 - 25, 2016

Campus closed


View more important dates


Academic Calendar 2015-2016
Academic Calendar 2016-2017


Weather Closing Procedures for UGA-Griffin

Spotlight on 2016 Turfgrass Research Field Day

Dr. Paul Raymer addresses attendees at Turfgrass Field Day in 2014
Dr. Paul Raymer addresses attendees at Turfgrass Field Day in 2014

Whether you’re a golf course superintendent or a homeowner who wants the perfect lawn, there’ll be something for you at a University of Georgia Turfgrass Field Day. Come and get the latest information on how to care for your lawn or your golf course from UGA researchers and extension specialists. Field day includes such topics as controlling turf insects like mole crickets and white grubs and turf pests like crabgrass and other turf weeds.

Field days also include information on newly released UGA turfgrasses including tall fescues that were bred especially for Georgia conditions. There are also updates on the Seashore Paspaulum breeding program at UGA. This turfgrass is especially popular along the coast as it can be irrigated with salt water.

There is always an excellent BBQ and chicken lunch followed by displays and demonstrations of the latest turfgrass industry equipment.

Visit the Georgia Turf page for more information or click here to register.



Spotlight on Research: UGA graduate research on display at south Georgia event

by Clint Thompson
Posted Thu, March 17, 2016
UGA graduate student Kiran Gadhave speaks about his research with Joe West, assistant dean on the UGA Tifton Campus on March 17, 2016
UGA graduate student Kiran Gadhave speaks about his research with Joe West, assistant dean on the UGA Tifton Campus on March 17, 2016.
Image credit: Clint Thompson

The University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources and the Graduate School jointly hosted a graduate research event, focusing specifically on research conducted in south Georgia. The reception, held Thursday, March 17, at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center, recognized 11 current graduate students who represented UGA’s campuses in Athens, Griffin and Tifton, Georgia, as well as the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation’s Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia. All of the student-scientists presented their research projects and spoke with invited guests about their work.

Among them was Shannon Parrish, who is pursuing a master’s degree in crop and soil sciences from CAES. Her research focuses on cotton’s sustainability in Georgia.

“As a graduate student, being able to present research (that) you have worked on is always exciting. With each presentation, I look forward to educating others on the importance of determining cotton’s sustainability in Georgia,” Parrish said. “I hope everyone I spoke to comes away from our encounter with an understanding of how vital cotton is to the state and the need for documenting the crop’s environmental footprint.”

Read the full story and find more research news here.



Spotlight on Extension: School gardens on the rise as teachers use them to teach STEM education

by Sharon Dowdy
Posted Tue, July, 19, 2016
UGA Extension community and school garden coordinator Becky Griffin speaks to a group of teachers at a school garden curriculum training at UGArden in Athens this summer. Image credit: Merritt Melancon.
UGA Extension community and school garden coordinator Becky Griffin speaks to a group of teachers at a school garden curriculum training at UGArden in Athens this summer. Image credit: Merritt Melancon.

Planting gardens at schools is not a new concept. The school garden movement first took off in 1917 when the U.S. School Garden Army was created with the motto, “A garden for every child, every child in a garden.” As of late, school gardens have experienced resurgence. A growing number of teachers are embracing school gardens to teach students much more than how to put a seed in the ground, care for it, watch it grow and enjoy the harvest provided by the plant.

Becky Griffin, community and school garden coordinator for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, says school gardens are gaining momentum for several reasons, including science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education requirements.

“Schools can get a feather in their cap for using their school garden to meet the STEM certification,” Griffin said. “Teachers use their gardens to teach history by growing beans that (Meriwether) Lewis and (William) Clark brought back from their expedition, and they plant colonial gardens filled with crops from the time of George Washington. They also use school gardens to teach math. You use lots of division and recording to plant a garden. Some teachers have the students grow their crops in geometric shapes.”

English teachers use school gardens by reading a book, then planting crops or flowers that were mentioned in the book, Griffin said.

School gardens are an excellent educational tool, but they are also hard work. In Coweta County, Georgia, Griffin was called in to consult on a potential school garden before the soil was tilled and the seeds were planted.

“First, the school administration needs to be on board, then the teachers, the parents and community leaders,” she said. “If the garden is being planned and planted by just one teacher, it’s going to fail. In the summer and during breaks from school, you need volunteers to help weed and water and care for the garden.”

To help Georgia teachers grow gardens and successfully use them as teaching tools, UGA Extension and the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture offer school garden teacher training. In the summer of 2015, 60 teachers from 24 Georgia counties were trained at workshops help in Athens, Atlanta and Griffin, Georgia. They learned about crops that are in season during the school year, how to test garden soil before planting and how to control pests using as little pesticide as possible.

For more information on this program, visit ugaurbanag.com/gardens/teacher-training.

Read the original article on the CAES website.