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Student Learning Center at UGA Griffin Students studying in front of the Naomi Chapman Woodruff Pavilion UGA Griffin used to be called Georgia Experiment Station, as represented by the sign that remains in front of the campus today Students studying in front of the Naomi Chapman Woodruff Pavilion Attendees arrive for an event at the Naomi Chapman Woodroof Pavillion at UGA Griffin Campus

A UGA degree is closer than you think.

University of Georgia Griffin was originally established as Georgia Experiment Station in 1888 and has played an integral role in the development of modern agriculture. While the campus is mostly known for its groundbreaking advancements in agricultural and environmental sciences, UGA Griffin began offering degree completion programs in 2005. Students at UGA Griffin enjoy low student-to-faculty ratios, and many students are able to take advantage of on-campus work and directed research opportunities so that they can gain real-world work experience while earning their University of Georgia degree.

Important Dates

Labor Day Holiday

Monday, September 5, 2016

Classes not in session
​Campus closed


CJ Day @ UGA Registration Opens

Friday, September 9, 2016

CJ Day @ UGA is Friday, November 11, 2016. Conference is free. Seating is limited so register early!


Fall Midterm

Tuesday, October 4, 2016


Withdrawal Deadline for Fall Classes

Tuesday, October 18, 2016


Fall Break

Friday, October 28, 2016

​Classes not in session


CJ Day @ UGA Conference

Friday, November 11, 2016


Undergraduate Application Deadline for Spring Semester

Tuesday, November 15, 2016


Thanksgiving Break

November 21 - 25, 2016

Classes not in session


Thanksgiving Holiday

November 24 - 25, 2016

Campus closed


Fall Classes End

Monday, December 5, 2016


View more important dates


Academic Calendar 2015-2016
Academic Calendar 2016-2017


Weather Closing Procedures for UGA-Griffin

Spotlight on Welcome Week

Welcome Week 2016 was a huge success with a great turnout for our many activities! Students, faculty, and staff participated in games and enjoyed various food and beverage offerings. There was even a lunch with Dr. Hunnicutt, the UGA-Griffin campus director, where students could meet and talk with him in person. Check out the photos below (photo credit: Sharon Dowdy).



Spotlight on Research: Researchers with the UGA CAES brought in $69 million in external funding during fiscal year 2016

by Merritt Melancon and James Hataway
Posted Thu, August 11, 2016
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. Image credit: Andrew Tucker/UGA Photo Services.
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. Image credit: Andrew Tucker/UGA Photo Services.

Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences broke records in fiscal year 2016 with $69 million in external funding to fuel college projects. From research plots across Georgia to state-of-the-art laboratories in Athens, Tifton and Griffin, CAES faculty members use this funding for research to support Georgia’s $74.3 billion agricultural industry and improve the food security and health of people around the world.

“This (achievement) was only possible because of the extraordinary efforts of our dedicated faculty, staff and graduate students,” said Sam Pardue, dean and director of CAES. “We’re proud of their creativity, their hard work and their commitment to identifying solutions to the challenges that face Georgia, our nation and the world.”

CAES’s external research funding totals helped contribute to a record-breaking year for research funding across the university.

In fiscal year 2016, research expenditures at UGA increased by 14 percent to reach $175.3 million. UGA’s dramatic increase in fiscal year 2016 comes on the heels of a 7 percent increase in fiscal year 2015 for a 21 percent rise over the past two years.

“As the university’s research productivity continues to increase, so does our ability to make a positive impact on our state, nation and world,” said UGA President Jere W. Morehead. “I am grateful to our outstanding faculty, whose commitment to excellence is helping to strengthen UGA’s position among the top public research universities in the country.”

Part of the bump in research funding across the university was a significant increase in funding from the National Science Foundation, highlighting UGA’s strength in plant research.

Five university research teams – including one team led by College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences horticulture Professor Esther van der Knaap, a recent Presidential hire – received a total of more than $14 million to explore the growth, development and behavior of a variety of plants, including tomatoes, sunflowers, maize, legumes, dogwood trees and soybeans.

For more information about the research being conducted by the faculty at CAES, visit research.caes.uga.edu. Explore the impact that CAES research has on the real world at apps.caes.uga.edu/impactstatements/.

James Hattaway of the UGA Office of the Vice President for Research contributed to this release.

Read the original article on the CAES website.



Spotlight on Extension: School gardens on the rise as teachers use them to teach STEM education

by Sharon Dowdy
Posted Tue, July, 19, 2016
UGA Extension community and school garden coordinator Becky Griffin speaks to a group of teachers at a school garden curriculum training at UGArden in Athens this summer. Image credit: Merritt Melancon.
UGA Extension community and school garden coordinator Becky Griffin speaks to a group of teachers at a school garden curriculum training at UGArden in Athens this summer. Image credit: Merritt Melancon.

Planting gardens at schools is not a new concept. The school garden movement first took off in 1917 when the U.S. School Garden Army was created with the motto, “A garden for every child, every child in a garden.” As of late, school gardens have experienced resurgence. A growing number of teachers are embracing school gardens to teach students much more than how to put a seed in the ground, care for it, watch it grow and enjoy the harvest provided by the plant.

Becky Griffin, community and school garden coordinator for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, says school gardens are gaining momentum for several reasons, including science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education requirements.

“Schools can get a feather in their cap for using their school garden to meet the STEM certification,” Griffin said. “Teachers use their gardens to teach history by growing beans that (Meriwether) Lewis and (William) Clark brought back from their expedition, and they plant colonial gardens filled with crops from the time of George Washington. They also use school gardens to teach math. You use lots of division and recording to plant a garden. Some teachers have the students grow their crops in geometric shapes.”

English teachers use school gardens by reading a book, then planting crops or flowers that were mentioned in the book, Griffin said.

School gardens are an excellent educational tool, but they are also hard work. In Coweta County, Georgia, Griffin was called in to consult on a potential school garden before the soil was tilled and the seeds were planted.

“First, the school administration needs to be on board, then the teachers, the parents and community leaders,” she said. “If the garden is being planned and planted by just one teacher, it’s going to fail. In the summer and during breaks from school, you need volunteers to help weed and water and care for the garden.”

To help Georgia teachers grow gardens and successfully use them as teaching tools, UGA Extension and the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture offer school garden teacher training. In the summer of 2015, 60 teachers from 24 Georgia counties were trained at workshops help in Athens, Atlanta and Griffin, Georgia. They learned about crops that are in season during the school year, how to test garden soil before planting and how to control pests using as little pesticide as possible.

For more information on this program, visit ugaurbanag.com/gardens/teacher-training.

Read the original article on the CAES website.